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states an authorization to use military force, a declaration of war or any similar authority shall not authorize the detention without charge or trial of a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the united states apprehended in the united states unless an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. that affirms the second circuit's clear statement rule from the padilla case. now, some may ask why this amendment protects green card holders as well as citizens and others may ask why the amendment does not protect all persons apprehended in the united states from indefinite detention. let me make clear i would support providing the protections in this amendment to all persons in the united states, whether lawfully or unlawfully present, but the question is is there enough support in this body to expand this amendment to cover others besides united states citizens and green card holders? i do not believe there is. we got 45 votes last year. we have gained support this year. and so my hope is that at least we can clear the law with a clear statement on citizens and legal resid
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
of your affection. [applause] >> thank you. i was interested in architecture. i used to look at the cathedral's because of how beautiful they are and how serene, the but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think how did people get those enormous homes? beauvis had no power tools, know mathematics for constructing cranes and so on, and so i became interested in how it was done and eventually became interested in the society that produced the great cathedrals and the question that strikes anybody is why are they there so i became fascinated by that and quite early on in my career when i was still struggling to make it as a writer i had a go at writing a novel about building a cathedral. i felt jerry convinced it was a great popular novel to be written in the cathedral in about 1976, i wrote a few chapters on an outline and i sent them to my agent. he didn't like it at all and he was right and he said you are writing a tapestry and what you need is a series of linked melodrama. the truth of the matter
provide that 5 million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to -- your story aside they tend to be fairly high jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. they tend to be weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the extent that we haven't really on the national scale at least at the federal government level, come up with a systematic way of trying to promote ourselves as a destination and there are certainly a lot of reasons beyond the cost of labor companies look to invest here and that has to do with education level, it has to do with putting the challenges aside some of the top educational institutions in the world. we have a legal system that protect investor rights, we have intellectual property rights that are very robust so there are other reasons companies look to invest and that's something we are trying to encourage around the world. the title of this is dillinger and opportunities and i think you leave out some of the challenges very well. one of the great opportunities and we don't know what the scale or the scope will be with shale gas and what we might see in the coming decade
will be live starting at 2 p.m. eastern, also on c-span3. here on c-span2, the u.s. senate gavels in and about half an hour at 9:30 a.m. eastern. they are expected to continue working on the 2013 defense programs policy bill, possible debate on 100th a minute and "roll call" votes happening throughout the day. senate lawmakers also continuing work on the floor on the fiscal cliff. majority whip senator dick durbin spoke about bipartisan negotiations to try to avoid the fiscal cliff at an event earlier this week at the center for american progress. we will show you as much of this as we can into the senate gavels in at 9:30 a.m. >> we are thrilled to have senator durbin to talk about his views on the fiscal cliff, and the framework. i think as we engage in this debate i just want to let a few things that are critical. as washington becomes obsessed with this issue. first and foremost, i think it will have consequences and that cap we have argued that the issues that are really framing the fiscal debate and fiscal cliff are ones that were actually dictated in the election context. the president
some cures and some scientific breakthroughs, like jim was talking about, that would move us beyond just saying we're going to have to cut medicare by $10 trillion over the next 50 years. >> i'm going to let jonathan respond and then i will let each panelist say when prediction on what they see ahead. jonathan. >> the question becomes do people want to work together. and politically if we think we can do better by opposing everything, you oppose everything. and politically think you can do better by working out deals the way gingrich and republican-led congress worked out deals with bill clinton. they will work that. as a matter of both sides willing to come to the table and give-and-take. >> so that was a very fast. like a journalist. version of what's going on. stand, predictions? >> i think the surprise -- surprise. maybe what happens with health care. health care reform and implantation of health care reform. because we talked about this as if there isn't other people. there are so many people who are in either in the process of or have to make decisions about going forward on h
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7